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ID: 236 (Conflict of Interest: K)

Die Europäische Flüchtlingskrise – eine Kinderurologische Perspektive

U.Tonnhofer, A.Springer, M.Metzelder, M.Hiess
Universitätsklinikum Wien, Wien

Einleitung

A refugee, according to the Geneva Convention on Refugees is a person who is outside their country of citizenship because of fear of persecution because of race, religion, sexual orientation, nationality, membership of a social group or political opinion. By 2015 there were more than 20 million refugees worldwide (Syrian 3.9million, Afghan 2.6million). Many of those seek asylum in Western Europe. In 2015, Austria (8.5million residents) expected approx. 100.000 refugees. However, many of those were on transit to other European countries.

Material und Methoden

Refugees crossed the border barrier via Hungary and Slovenia. Temporarily border controls were stopped and refugees could pass through the country after registration (against Dublin regulation) or apply for asylum in Austria. Most of underage and unattended refugees were placed in the refugee camp Traiskirchen (near Vienna) or Vienna. We report selected cases of our pediatric urology experience with pediatric refugee population.

Ergebnisse

Between September and November 2015 we have seen 16 children with a mean age of 6.7yrs (0-13yrs) with problems following hypospadias repair (4),  neuropathic bladder (7), and 5 other urologic conditions (high grade VUR, PUJO, DSD, bladder extrophy). Country of origin: Somalia 2, Afghanistan 5, Syria 5, other 4). All patients did not have any medical records. The majority of the children presented with severe and advanced disease. Management was complicated by language barriers, difficult arrangement of follow-up, cultural difficulties, little experience in advanced disease, bureaucracy and administration, and many others.

Schlussfolgerung

The European migrant crisis is a major political, socioeconomic and cultural challenge. There is significant burden and pressure on national health care systems. Management of pediatric urological patients with migration background is challenging and requires substantial resources.