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ID: 237 (Conflict of Interest: K)

Der Einfluß des Kölner Urteils auf die Beschneidungshäufigkeit im deutschsprachigen Europa

A.Weinhandl, M.Metzelder, A.Springer, G.Fülöp
Universitätsklinikum Wien, Wien

Einleitung

In 2012, a Court in Cologne/Germany ruled that CC for religious reasons amounted to grievous bodily harm, and was therefore a criminal act, prohibited by law. In this study, we sought to determine the influence of the Cologne court decision (CCD) on the frequency of CC in Austria, Germany and Switzerland between 2002 and 2015.

Material und Methoden

Austrian CC data were obtained from Gesundheit Österreich GmbH, German CC data from the Institute for Hospital Remuneration System, and Swiss CC data from the Swiss Federal Statistical Office.

Ergebnisse

There is a substantial lack of robust epidemiologic data on CC in Germany and Switzerland. Austria: approximately 600-800 CC per 100.000 male inhabitants aged < 20 are performed each year. Data include inpatient and outpatient procedures. There is a negative nationwide trend with significant geographical differences. Germany: approx. 100-150 CC per 100.000 male inhabitants aged <20 years were performed. Data include inpatient and “day –clinic-patients”.  Robust data on procedures performed outpatient or in private practice were not available. There was a significant decrease in the frequency of CC in 2005 and 2006, since then CC rates remain stable. In 2012, the CCD did not influence CC rates. Switzerland: Between 2001 and 2014 100-400 infant male CC have been performed as an inpatient procedure annually in the age group 0 to 14 year old boys. These data show a significant increase in the frequency of CC between 2002 and 2004, followed by a substantial decline in 2005 and 2006, a trend that continues since then.

Schlussfolgerung

In Austria, Germany and Switzerland there has been a declining incidence of circumcision over the last decade with no significant decrease after the CCD in 2012. Discussion about CC in German speaking Europe is complicated by the lack of robust epidemiologic data.